Air-Radiohead.com

Revue de Presse de RH

Lum · 829 · 328143

0 Membres et 2 Invités sur ce sujet

Hors ligne magirl

  • Hippo nain
  • ***
    • Messages: 505
oui j'ai vu ça dans "envoyé spécial", les étudiants qui les écoutent dans leurs chambres...






Hors ligne PadKidA

  • Hippo nain
  • ***
    • Messages: 616

Citer
Bryan Ferry embarque Flea et Jonny Greenwood
Le bassiste des Red Hot Chili Peppers, Flea; et le guitariste de Radiohead Johnny Greenwood: on ne s’y attendait pas trop, mais les deus hommes ont prêté leur génie musical au nouvel album solo de Bryan Ferry. L’ancien leader de Roxy Music a aussi fait appel à Nile Rodgers, star mondiale du groupe de disco Chic (Le freak!). Un choix bizarre, s’il en est. Mais Ferry est aussi un homme de son temps, preuve en est sa collaboration avec DJ Hell. Ils sortent le single U Can Dance en janvier. Par contre, pas encore de nouvelles de l’album de Ferry!(25/11/09)


Hors ligne magirl

  • Hippo nain
  • ***
    • Messages: 505

Hors ligne Hebus

  • est un petit
  • Hippo nain
  • ***
    • Messages: 969
Le retour de Radiohead en studio est annoncé pour le mois de janvier.
Parmis tous les peuples de la Gaule, les belges sont les plus graves.


Hors ligne the lukewarm

  • Bidule
  • ****
    • Messages: 1085
Joyeux comme ils ont l'air, ils vont nous pondre un "POP" ou quelque chose dans le genre.


Hors ligne Overground

  • Bidule
  • ****
    • Messages: 1361
J'ai trouvé un article (en anglais désolé) qui résume parfaitement ce que je pense de Radiohead, sur leur statut tout ça. La comparaison avec U2 a ses limites et celle avec Animal Collective peu aisée, mais ça se tient :

2009 : A Decade After Radiohead Became U2, Animal Collective Becomes Radiohead

To call OK Computer a great album is an understatement on par with “Jesus is a pretty popular guy.” Especially around Christmas. The album, ranked by many as the best of the distant, now seemingly archaic decade of the 1990’s, was the culmination of a band putzing around its own creative potential for a few albums, then, each member at once, pouncing on that potential, ripping it to shreds like hyenas and emerging from the fight with scratches and cuts and one of the most gorgeous, haunting and classic rock albums of all time. Is there a song in the rock’n’roll canon that’s more of a mental-musical tapeworm than “Karma Police”? Is there a guitar riff as ragged and tearing and high-beams-blinding as that of “Electioneering”? I dare you to find one. And if you did, it’d likely also be by Radiohead.

Thing is, OK Computer was almost too good, because it effectively cast Radiohead into the spotlight as “Smartest Band in the World,” a title that, until only recently, with SPIN Magazine’s ballsy and long overdue article busting rock myths, was even questioned. In this decade, so very nearing its close as you read this, appreciation for Radiohead has been elevated so high it can be summed up with one simple phrase: “Well, of course you do.”

With four albums since OK Computer released in the past decade, Radiohead is now more an academic institution than a rock band. To appreciate the band’s music is to receive automatic admission into a circle, albeit a large one, of music fans who view Radiohead as the standard for not only quality music, but, on some level, intellectual acuity. To like, or rather to understand Radiohead is to express that your music appreciation is on a different par than, say, the casual FM radio-listener or, better yet, the passionate Nickelback fan. The credo may as well be: “I think, therefore I like Radiohead.”

Mind you, this is not to say that Radiohead’s output has been poor or lazy; indeed it’s been quite the opposite. But the point remains—just like Thom sang on OK Computer, there are “no surprises.” No matter what Radiohead put out, we’ll nod, throw heaping praise on it like we’re painting a house just by chucking buckets at a wall, and comment on how they’ve still got it.

But do they?

Hail to the Thief was fantastic, but expectedly so. Again, no surprises. In Rainbows was similarly solid, but offered little in new ground broken. Both albums were great, but we knew they would be, thereby erasing any danger, any real excitement from the once-thrilling experience of being a Radiohead fan, the pinnacle of which would be 1999-2001. And, to cite the most common argument tossed against Radiohead, what’s rock’n’roll without any danger?

The same problem faces U2, though in a wholly different arena. U2 released a string of albums in the 1980’s which were, similarly, made by a group of musically talented gents dancing around genius until they finally hit it with The Joshua Tree, which was, interestingly enough, also released towards the end of a decade. The Joshua Tree placed U2 not on Radiohead’s intellectually reliable pedestal, but on a much more accessible one—that of the great rock band for the common man. Just as many nerdling rock writers love “Where the Streets Have No Name” as FM radio hounds. In 1987, U2 effectively erased the need to advance any farther. Though they did grow and change (1991’s Achtung Baby might as well have set the bar for what would eventually be dubbed "Alternative Rock"), the common U2 fan cared not—U2 were brilliant, forever and always. According to mainstream media and mainstream fans, they still are—this year’s No Line on the Horizon, debatably no better than the band’s middling mid-90’s output, was hailed by Rolling Stone as the best album of 2009. On the pedestal U2 remain.

And on that pedestal is a scary place to be, at least for a fan looking so far up that the light is blinding, hoping that a once-favorite band will come down to earth and try something new, something exciting, something human. For most, U2 is too far in space to ever return—hell, the band’s 2009 tour was not only the largest-scale stage set up of all time, but said stage was specifically built to look like a rocket ship. Unaware of the irony? Doubtful. Radiohead, on the other hand, are still floating within reach, hopefully, though this humble observer believes that it’s over—the moment has passed, and Radiohead will forever remain stuck in the gelatinous pool of misplaced intellectualism.

So what’s to learn from this? One thing, mainly, and that is to tread carefully with Animal Collective. I know, pulled that one out of left field, but follow me: Animal Collective’s Merriweather Post Pavillion was universally hailed as the band’s creative and commercial pinnacle, and rightfully so. The album saw a band that had released a handful of cultishly beloved albums breaking through to a new, much huger audience than ever before with its most creative and exciting work yet. OK Computer. The Joshua Tree. Is this bound to happen every 10 years?

Counting out U2 for a minute, if only for that band’s more regular-dude fanbase, the similarities between Radiohead and Animal Collective, precisely one decade apart, are spooky. Both bands are ones to ‘get.’ People ‘get’ Radiohead, they ‘understand’ Radiohead. And, sure, that makes sense—just like many a band cast aside by that same regular-dude club because said band is a little weird and dude simply listens to hear something that isn’t there, like an easy-to-catch chorus, there’s a sense of specific inclusion in being a Radiohead or Animal Collective fan. Animal Collective is now the intellectual standard to which, supposedly, independent thinking music fans are held. “I think (and dance, probably awkwardly), therefore I like Animal Collective.” Whether that notion of ‘getting’ either band and the resulting critical, blanket acceptance has anything to do with the creative plateau seen with Radiohead is anybody’s guess, but it hasn’t yet happened with Animal Collective.

Let’s hope it doesn’t. Fuck pedestals.

Words / Justin Jacobs


http://myoldkyhome.blogspot.com/2010/01/2009-decade-after-radiohead-became-u2.html

Si quelqu'un a le courage de le lire, qu'il fasse part de son opinion !  :content:


Hors ligne kid armor

  • Floodeur pro
  • *****
    • Messages: 6430
Source les Inrocks :

http://www.lesinrocks.com/musique/musique-article/t/1262685481/article/radiohead-au-boulot-avec-et-sans-thom-yorke/

Radiohead au boulot, avec et sans Thom Yorke
Le boulot progresse sur la suite d'In Rainbows, explique Ed O'Brien, et Radiohead semble préparer une nouvelle révolution intime. En parallèle, Thom Yorke, qui ne compte plus ses bonnes oeuvres, a écrit trois nouveaux morceaux pour la bande-son d'un documentaire sur le Tibet.

Le 05 janvier 2010- par Thomas Burgel1 Commentaire(s) Agrandir la taille du texte Réduire la taille du texte Imprimer Envoyer à un ami
On le lit dans les yeux brillants d'envie des fans, on le capte dans leurs membres tremblants de désir, on le sait également depuis quelques déclarations officielles des membres du groupes il y a quelques mois : Radiohead est au boulot sur la suite, forcément très attendue, d'In Rainbows. Les choses ont été quelque peu précisées ces dernières semaines, sur le blog officiel du groupe puis dans une interview donnée au Rolling Stone US par Ed O'Brien : le changement, profond, semble être l'objectif clair du groupe.

"L'esprit dans notre camp est à présent fantastique, a-t-il ainsi expliqué sur Dead Air Space, et nous retournons en studio en janvier pour continuer ce que nous avons commencé l'été dernier. Je suis sincèrement excité par ce que nous sommes en train de faire, mais je ne peux en dire plus,pour des raisons évidentes... Nous aimons de toute façon tous les surprises, n'est-ce pas ? Il y a 10 ans, nous étions collectivement (le groupe) dans le territoire de Kid A... et bien que nous soyons immensément fiers de cet album, ce n'étaient pas des terres drôles à visiter. Ce qui est rassurant, c'est que nous sommes désormais définitivement un groupe différent, ce qui devrait vouloir dire que la musique est également différente, et c'est tout l'objectif du jeu... continuer à bouger."

Quant à l'interview donnée au Rolling Stone US, pas moins intéressante quant à l'état d'esprit du groupe, elle laisse également transparaître des directions franchement neuves. "Nous nous sentons beaucoup plus fort dans notre art, dans ce que nous faisons. Nous avons répété ces quatre dernières semaines, pour ce nouvel album. Et nous sommes sur quelque chose de très différent, de très nouveau. Je ne sais pas si c'est pertinent, mais j'en parlais avec Phil il y a trois jours. Nous nous demandions ce qui avait changé, et l'une des principales différences est que nous faisons désormais les choses sans aucune peur. (...) Je suis un optimiste éternel, mais je crois qu'on peut vraiment bouger sur ce disque. C'est ce que nous avons tous en tête en ce moment, c'est ce que nous sentons dans nos tripes,pendant que nous répétons -nous sommes en train de profondément changer."

Bonne nouvelle, donc : ceux qui se sont lassés des Anglais pourraient vite retourner au bercail si les choses évoluent réellement à ce point. Autre bonne nouvelle pour les fans transis de la troupe : Radiohead n'occupe pas 100% du temps de ses membres. Thomas Edward Yorke, garçon engagé, très engagé, trop engagé râlent ceux qui se lassent de ses miaulements péremptoires sur l'Etat du monde et les ravages de la méchante civilisation sur son propre écosystème, a ainsi pris un peu sur son temps de récré pour coucher sur partition trois nouveaux morceaux solo. Ceux-ci, aux côté de compositions de Philipp Glass et de Damian Rice, serviront de bande-son à un documentaire nommé When the Dragon Swallows the Sun, réalisé sur la longue durée de sept ans et consacré aux luttes tibétaines. Le site officiel du film, dont la date de sortie n'a pas encore été annoncée, vous en dira un peu plus et vous présentera quelques premières images.
everything in its right place !?!


Hors ligne biblion

  • Sklavax
  • **
    • Messages: 251
Pitchfork annonce aussi un remix par Thom Yorke sur le prochain album des Liars qui sortira le 9 mars (sur le disc bonus exactement)

Mais le style des Inrocks est vraiment de plus en plus stupide (ah ah on se gausse de ces musiciens qui ont des convictions, c'est tellement mieux de se remuer juste pour le fun, tellement plus classe de n'avoir rien dans le citron): qui a dit que RH travaillait sans Thom Yorke? Ils se mettent à l'anglais dans ce journal ou ils continuent à utiliser Google Translation?

Quant aux comparaisons entre U2, Radiohead et Animal Collective, personnellement je trouve que ça sent la paresse: à part que U2 et RH correspondent tous les deux à la définition de "groupes populaires menés par un leader charismatique", je ne vois pas d'autres rapports (il est où le Kid A de U2?) et il suffit de rappeler que MPP est le 9ème album d'Animal Collective pour ficher en l'air le parallèle...Enfin il me semble qu'il y a des comparaisons plus signifiantes...mais c'est juste mon opinion...


Hors ligne little fishy

  • Bidule
  • ****
    • Messages: 2529
Et bien moi ça me fait bien plaisir de voir qu'il y a des personnes qui s'énervent, cela prouve qu'il y en a qui ne dorment pas :content:

Lecture rapide du texte de J.Jacobs: alors comme, ça pour lui, KIDAMNESIAC = No surprise  :wtf:

Sinon, le 16 janvier, sortie de BIG FAN, une fiction de Fabrice Colin avec Radiohead au centre de l'histoire/ Source rh.fr
"Si la musique ne te transporte pas, si la musique ne te rend pas meilleur, alors n’en écoute pas"

« Modifié: jeu. 7 janvier 2010, 23:38:40 par little fishy »


En ligne Empty

  • Bidule
  • ****
    • Messages: 2617
ah oui j'ai lu cette news sur radiohead.fr
je suis allé sur la fnac tout a l'heure pour le trouver
en meme temps si il sort le 16 ....  :leg9:  :think:

curieux de voir ce que ça donne quand meme ce bouquin


Hors ligne kid armor

  • Floodeur pro
  • *****
    • Messages: 6430

"Si la musique ne te transporte pas, si la musique ne te rend pas meilleur, alors n’en écoute pas"

c'est tout con, mais je valide !
everything in its right place !?!